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Tag Archives: lessons learned

In a survey about the experience of handling major losses undertaken Vericlaim and Alarm, more than half of respondents “rated the practical assistance offered by a BCP (Business Continuity Plan) following a major incident as one or two out of a possible score of five”. In other words, the BC Plans of the organisations responding to the survey were found to not particularly helpful when responding to a major loss!

This finding seems to have been rather under reported by the BC community who are usually so forward in explaining the importance of having a BC Plan and extolling the virtues of BC in improving resilience. Personally, I find it a damning indictment of the BC profession.

One of the things that constantly both amuses and horrifies me is how far most BC Plans are from the description given in the Business Continuity Institute’s (BCI’s) Good Practice Guidelines. This states that a BC Plan should be “…focused, specific and easy to use…”, and that the important characteristics for an effective BC Plan are that is direct, adaptable, concise, and relevant.

Over the years I have had the pleasure of see hundreds, if not thousands of BC Plans from a wide variety of organisations, and I can safely say that more than 90% of these plans do not fit in with this description. They tend to contain lots of information that is irrelevant to the purpose of responding to a major incident and seem to be written more for the benefit of the organisation’s auditors than for use by people who need to take action to reduce the impact of the incident on the organisation.

As a BC consultant, I keep trying my best to improve BC Plans, but I’m constantly being knocked back by people who tell me that all sorts of things need to be put into their BC Plans, more often than not because of an audit or review undertaken by a third party.

For far too long this situation has been allowed to continue unchallenged. It cannot do so for too much longer without the BC profession losing credibility.

 

 

Reading about one of the causes of the catastrophic failures at Mid Staffordshire NHS Trust, which lead to more than 1,200 patient deaths, reminded me of a similar issue that plagues many implementations of Business Continuity Management (BCM) programmes. This was the Trust’s concentration on achieving targets that would enable them to get a good rating from the NHS auditors rather than the most important objective, which was to ensure that patients left hospital in a better state of health than when they were admitted.

The issue in many BCM implementations is that organisations are looking to get a good rating from their auditors by doing all the things that a standard states they should do rather than the working to achieve the most important objective, which is to improve the organisation’s resilience.

Setting targets based on readily measurable things is straightforward, and allows auditors to identify whether or not an outcome has been achieved, or how close it is to being achieved. Setting targets on things that it’s difficult to measure is problematic, and gives auditors a major problem when making an assessment. Unfortunately, the trend in many sectors over the past 20 years has been to rely more and more on these measurable targets when assessing performance, and to ignore the most important target. BCM has been no exception – achieving compliance against BS 25999 or ISO 22301 is commonly seen as the main objective, not becoming more resilient.

Hopefully, what has happened at Mid Staffordshire NHS Trust will be the start of the end of relying on peripheral, measurable targets, and the world will move back to looking at how well an organisation is achieving its critical objectives. Don’t bet the house on it though.

The RBS systems failure should become a case study in Business Continuity, but I doubt that it will as the bank won’t want to advertise how it managed to not only get something seriously wrong, but how it took so long to fix and what it really cost. Every Business Continuity professional should be interested in this so that they can learn from any mistakes that were made, and see how Business Continuity Plans were used in response to a real disruption.

The first thing that I’m interested in though, is whether or not RBS activated its strategic level Business Continuity Plan, which may be known as an Incident or Crisis Management Plan. Presuming that RBS has such a plan, was it used, or did a group of senior executives just get together and decide what to do without reference to the plan?

Secondly, did the person who first identified that a software upgrade had gone wrong just try and fix it, or did they also escalate the issue up the management chain of command? If so, did it get to the top quickly, or did it stay hidden until the effect of the problem became widely known?

Being a UK taxpayer, I’m a shareholder in RBS. As a shareholder, I’d like RBS to undertake a thorough post incident review and publish the results so that we can all learn from what went wrong.