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Category Archives: resilience

I have just attended a very good Business Continuity (BC) conference held in Malaysia by GRC Consulting Services in conjunction with the Business Continuity Institute (BCI), but I couldn’t help being concerned about the fact that the standards industry is producing more and more management systems standards in and around the subject of BC.

Why is this happening? Well, to my mind, there seem to be two drivers behind this trend, neither of which are good for BC.

The first one, which an increasing number of people seem to be talking about, is that the main bodies behind the development of all these standards have discovered a rich source of revenue and are now exploiting this for all that it’s worth. These bodies claim to be “not for profit”, but like many such organisations there are large numbers of people engaged in standards activities that derive considerable profit from the work that they do. The more standards that they produce the more these people profit from the work that they do.

This driver is simply the age old story of people making a profit when they can, and is not too dangerous as it will eventually come to an end when the people buying and using the standards come to realise what’s going on. The second driver though, it much more dangerous, as it strikes at the heart of BC and has the capacity to cause enormous damage.

This second driver is the desire to make something that is difficult, complex, and demanding, and which requires considerable skill and experience, simple to implement through a process that can be implemented by a management system. To see what I mean, you need look no further than BS 65000, the recently published Guidance for Organizational Resilience, which, to quote the body that produced it – “This landmark standard provides an overview of resilience, describing the foundations required and explaining how to build resilience.”

Organizational Resilience is something that every company continuously tries to achieve. It is nothing new, and has been an essential goal ever since the first company was founded. Few manage it over the long term, and the life of most companies is very short as the products and services that they produce become outdated and overtaken by new trends, ideas, and inventions. If explaining how to build resilience can be described in a short pamphlet and implemented by anyone with the capability to read and follow a set of procedures, then how come it was missed by so many millions of people involved in the running of the hundreds of thousands of companies that have failed?

The international standard for Organizational Resilience (ISO 22316) is due to publish in 2016, which must be a great relief for all those organisations that are struggling to survive in the ever more competitive markets in which they operate. All they now have to do is implement the standard, be audited for compliance, and get the certificate. So much easier than researching and developing new products, finding new markets, producing the products and services at competitive cost, controlling cash flow, hiring and maintaining the right people with the right skills, complying with ever increasing legislation, developing and enhancing reputation, etc.