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Tag Archives: being prepared

Finally, at long last, there appears to be some real evidence that Business Continuity (BC) works. After years of effort trying to debunk the 80% myth (80% of organisations that don’t have a BC plan fail withing 18 months of suffering from a major incident – or something similar), I’ve now seen some real research that demonstrates that BC does, in fact, have a beneficial impact.

The research takes the form of a study from IBM Security (conducted by the Ponemon Institute), which analyses the financial impact of data breaches. According to the study, leveraging an incident response team was the single biggest factor associated with reducing the cost of a data breach: saving companies nearly $400,000 on average (or $16 per record).  The study also found that the longer it takes to detect and contain a data breach, the more costly it becomes to resolve.

Admittedly, the study covers only cyber security, but at least it’s a start. It confirms the long held assumption in BC circles that being able to quickly and effectively activate a response team to handle an incident is one of the most effective ways of reducing the impact of the incident on the organisation.

Now all we need is for someone to widen the research to cover all disruptive incidents. Anyone want to do a PhD is BC?

The report can be downloaded at http://www-03.ibm.com/security/data-breach/index.html.

Another day, another politician that thinks that contingency plans shouldn’t be developed. This time it’s the head of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, who has told his officials not to work on contingency plans for Greece’s possible exit from the euro. Why? Apparently it’s because the plans could be leaked and cause turmoil in financial markets.

In other words, Europe’s top politician has effectively told everyone that he believes that Business Continuity planning is a dangerous discipline and that Business Continuity Plans should not be developed just in case they are leaked to the media.

Trying to sell the benefits of investing in Business Continuity is hard at the best of times, but now we have Jean-Claude Juncker and his helpful ideas. It’s not as bad as the person who once told me that he didn’t want to develop a Business Continuity Plan as it was tempting fate, but it’s getting close.

The prevailing view of the Business Continuity (BC) community is that the only benefits of not having a Business Continuity Plan (BCP) are that you’ll be saving a small amount of time and money, but with huge downsides if you ever suffer from an incident that causes major disruption to your operations. But this may have to be revised as a result of fire at a Dogs’ Home in Manchester in the UK last Thursday evening.

The fire, which was tackled by more than 30 firefighters, was a tragic event that killed about 60 animals. Some 150 dogs were saved, and from all the reports it looks as if the staff did not have a pre-prepared BCP. However, the public rallied round after the Dogs’ Home asked for people to provide temporary foster care for the rescued dogs. Large numbers of people turned up to help, volunteers at the site began collecting dog food, bedding and other items donated by the public, and a JustGiving account set up by the Manchester Evening News raised more than £1.2m. In fact so many people tried to turn up to help that the Cheshire Police tweeted: “High Volume of Vehicles at Cheshire Dogs Home to adopt dogs following the recent tragic fire. Avoid area if travelling.”

Volunteers are saying they have been overwhelmed by the response and that they now have rooms full of dog food, blankets, crates and baskets, and although many members of staff say they’re devastated by the fire, there’s a sense of optimism and comradeship as as fosterers turn up to take dogs home.

The net result seems to be that the Dogs’ Home is far better off than if they had had a BCP that clicked seamlessly into operation and hadn’t had to ask for help. So, before you decide to spend time and money on developing a BCP, ask yourself if you should just wait until an incident happens and hope that help and assistance will be provided by the public. Maybe this would only happen in the UK and to a Dogs’ Home. I wouldn’t recommend that a bank tries it!

Yesterday I finally got round to doing a job that I’d been putting off for weeks – updating my company’s Business Continuity Plan (BCP). The system that we use to manage Business Continuity, Mataco, had been regularly sending me reminders that it needed to be reviewed, but I’d been ignoring them because it wasn’t my top priority and besides, it’s an extremely boring job.

Now, my role in Merrycon is to provide Business Continuity consultancy, and the need to keep BCPs up to date is one of the things that I keep telling my clients that they need to do. I seem to spend significant amounts of time and effort helping clients set up structures and procedures to ensure that BCP maintenance is carried out in a timely and effective way, and in training client staff in how to update their BCPs. To be fair, I do advise my clients that it’s a task that people don’t like doing, but I regularly find myself in the position of criticising clients for not keeping their BCPs up to date.

So, the question is, how do I make the task of keeping BCPs up to date exciting? How do I make people want to spend time checking through their BCP to see what needs to be updated, then spend time updating the BCP, and then to spend time making sure that everyone has a copy of the new version of the BCP? I need the answer to this question not only for my clients, but for me as well.

The motto of the scouting movement is “Be Prepared”, which could just as well be adopted by the Business Continuity industry. I have, for some time now, been looking for a good “party” definition of Business Continuity, and now I think I’ve found one.

A  “party” definition is where someone that you meet in a social setting asks “What is Business Continuity?” You then have a split second in which to think of an interesting and engaging answer. The best one that I had previously was “Making sure that the product gets to the customer”, now I have “Being Prepared”.

Has anyone else got any pithy definitions?