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Monthly Archives: September 2014

The prevailing view of the Business Continuity (BC) community is that the only benefits of not having a Business Continuity Plan (BCP) are that you’ll be saving a small amount of time and money, but with huge downsides if you ever suffer from an incident that causes major disruption to your operations. But this may have to be revised as a result of fire at a Dogs’ Home in Manchester in the UK last Thursday evening.

The fire, which was tackled by more than 30 firefighters, was a tragic event that killed about 60 animals. Some 150 dogs were saved, and from all the reports it looks as if the staff did not have a pre-prepared BCP. However, the public rallied round after the Dogs’ Home asked for people to provide temporary foster care for the rescued dogs. Large numbers of people turned up to help, volunteers at the site began collecting dog food, bedding and other items donated by the public, and a JustGiving account set up by the Manchester Evening News raised more than £1.2m. In fact so many people tried to turn up to help that the Cheshire Police tweeted: “High Volume of Vehicles at Cheshire Dogs Home to adopt dogs following the recent tragic fire. Avoid area if travelling.”

Volunteers are saying they have been overwhelmed by the response and that they now have rooms full of dog food, blankets, crates and baskets, and although many members of staff say they’re devastated by the fire, there’s a sense of optimism and comradeship as as fosterers turn up to take dogs home.

The net result seems to be that the Dogs’ Home is far better off than if they had had a BCP that clicked seamlessly into operation and hadn’t had to ask for help. So, before you decide to spend time and money on developing a BCP, ask yourself if you should just wait until an incident happens and hope that help and assistance will be provided by the public. Maybe this would only happen in the UK and to a Dogs’ Home. I wouldn’t recommend that a bank tries it!