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Tag Archives: incident response

In a survey about the experience of handling major losses undertaken Vericlaim and Alarm, more than half of respondents “rated the practical assistance offered by a BCP (Business Continuity Plan) following a major incident as one or two out of a possible score of five”. In other words, the BC Plans of the organisations responding to the survey were found to not particularly helpful when responding to a major loss!

This finding seems to have been rather under reported by the BC community who are usually so forward in explaining the importance of having a BC Plan and extolling the virtues of BC in improving resilience. Personally, I find it a damning indictment of the BC profession.

One of the things that constantly both amuses and horrifies me is how far most BC Plans are from the description given in the Business Continuity Institute’s (BCI’s) Good Practice Guidelines. This states that a BC Plan should be “…focused, specific and easy to use…”, and that the important characteristics for an effective BC Plan are that is direct, adaptable, concise, and relevant.

Over the years I have had the pleasure of see hundreds, if not thousands of BC Plans from a wide variety of organisations, and I can safely say that more than 90% of these plans do not fit in with this description. They tend to contain lots of information that is irrelevant to the purpose of responding to a major incident and seem to be written more for the benefit of the organisation’s auditors than for use by people who need to take action to reduce the impact of the incident on the organisation.

As a BC consultant, I keep trying my best to improve BC Plans, but I’m constantly being knocked back by people who tell me that all sorts of things need to be put into their BC Plans, more often than not because of an audit or review undertaken by a third party.

For far too long this situation has been allowed to continue unchallenged. It cannot do so for too much longer without the BC profession losing credibility.

 

 

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As most people are only too well aware, the way that we find and use information is going through a radical and fundamental change, which is being driven by the Internet. What doesn’t seem to have permeated the world of Business Continuity though, is that this change is revolutionising the Business Continuity Plan.

Not too many years ago, in our house, we used to keep a telephone directory and combined bus and train timetable near our front door, close to where we had our telephone. Today, we have neither of those things, and if we want to find a telephone number or the time of a bus or train we’ll simply use the Internet, and rapidly find what we’re looking without wading through pages and pages of small print trying to decipher how the directory or timetable is organised before getting to the information that we want. We also had the depressing problem of finding out later on that we’d looked up the information in a document that was out of date, and that one of the family had inadvertently thrown away the new version and kept the old one.

Telephone directories and timetables are just two examples of documents that are being used by fewer and fewer people, and most of those are older people who find it hard to change a lifetime’s habits. Using printed documents to find information is becoming a thing of the past, as anyone who mixes with youngsters will confirm. Why then, do we persist with documents in the world of Business Continuity, what’s wrong with just finding the information that we need from the Internet?

The problems of document based Business Continuity Plans are only too well known. Unfortunately, more often than not, they are difficult to use in a crisis, contain unnecessary information, and are out of date. What we really need is something that is simple to use, delivers exactly what is required, and provides the latest information. That is an App.

An App is short for an Application, and is quite simply a piece of software designed to fulfil a particular purpose, and is downloaded by a user to a computing device from which it can be used. Apps can be used to obtain information, and when designed to provide the information required to respond to an incident, they are an ideal and powerful tool.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that holding a Business Continuity Plan as a PDF document and making it available on the Internet via an App is the same thing as an App designed to enable someone to respond to an incident, it’s not. You don’t look up the time of a train on the Internet by opening up a PDF document and searching through it, do you?
A Business Continuity App can provide responders with clear, action orientated, and time-based direction, while allowing quick access to relevant and up to date support information. Exactly what we want to achieve.

This revolution has profound consequences for world of Business Continuity, and if you’d to find out what these are, then come and listen to me present at the BCI World Conference and Exhibition in November. The Business Continuity Plan, as a document, is dead, long live the Business Continuity App.