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Category Archives: standards

Cyber and terrorist attacks currently appear to dominate Business Continuity (BC) thinking, but over the weekend we had a classic example of a good old fashioned failure of a critical IT system causing major disruption and some resulting poor incident management that compounded the problem. The company involved was British Airways (BA), and I say poor incident management because this is what the public has perceived and what BA customers experienced. No doubt there will be an internal BA investigation into what went wrong, but as a BC professional I’d love to know about three aspects of the incident and BA’s response:

  1. How long did it take from the initial failure of the system for the IT support technicians to realise that they were dealing with a major incident, who did they escalate the incident to (if anyone), were the people designated to handle major incident contactable, and was the problem compounded by the fact that BA’s IT had been outsourced to India?
  2. The system that failed is so critical to BA’s operations that it must have had a Recovery Time Objective (RTO) of minutes, or at worst, a couple of hours. To achieve this, BA should have put in place a duplicate live version of the system (Active/Active). Either BA did not have such a recovery option in place (I’m guessing that they had a replica – Active/Passive), which implies that they failed to understand the need to have a very short downtime on the system, or it had not been properly tested and failed when required.
  3. Why were the communications with customers  (people who were booked on BA flights) handled so badly? BA must have a plan to communicate with passengers, but was this dependent on the very system that failed?

For me, even before the inquest takes place, the major lesson to be learned is that the effectiveness of an organisation’s BC and incident response plans can only be assured by actually using the plans and responding to incidents. If you don’t want to find this out in response to a real incident, then you need to run realistic and regular exercises so that every aspect of your response is tested and the people involved know what to do. It doesn’t matter how good your Business Continuity Management (BCM) process is, how closely aligned to ISO 22301 it is, how good the result of the latest BC audit, or how much documentation you have. It’s your ability to respond effectively and recover in time that matters.

BA have suffered damage to their reputation , how much is yet to be seen. They will have suffered financial damage, and when the London Stock Market opens for trading we’ll see how much it has affected their share price. Maybe BA do run realistic and regular exercises. If they do, they should have identified the issues with the systems and incident response that were encountered over the weekend and acted on the lessons learned.

 

 

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I have just attended a very good Business Continuity (BC) conference held in Malaysia by GRC Consulting Services in conjunction with the Business Continuity Institute (BCI), but I couldn’t help being concerned about the fact that the standards industry is producing more and more management systems standards in and around the subject of BC.

Why is this happening? Well, to my mind, there seem to be two drivers behind this trend, neither of which are good for BC.

The first one, which an increasing number of people seem to be talking about, is that the main bodies behind the development of all these standards have discovered a rich source of revenue and are now exploiting this for all that it’s worth. These bodies claim to be “not for profit”, but like many such organisations there are large numbers of people engaged in standards activities that derive considerable profit from the work that they do. The more standards that they produce the more these people profit from the work that they do.

This driver is simply the age old story of people making a profit when they can, and is not too dangerous as it will eventually come to an end when the people buying and using the standards come to realise what’s going on. The second driver though, it much more dangerous, as it strikes at the heart of BC and has the capacity to cause enormous damage.

This second driver is the desire to make something that is difficult, complex, and demanding, and which requires considerable skill and experience, simple to implement through a process that can be implemented by a management system. To see what I mean, you need look no further than BS 65000, the recently published Guidance for Organizational Resilience, which, to quote the body that produced it – “This landmark standard provides an overview of resilience, describing the foundations required and explaining how to build resilience.”

Organizational Resilience is something that every company continuously tries to achieve. It is nothing new, and has been an essential goal ever since the first company was founded. Few manage it over the long term, and the life of most companies is very short as the products and services that they produce become outdated and overtaken by new trends, ideas, and inventions. If explaining how to build resilience can be described in a short pamphlet and implemented by anyone with the capability to read and follow a set of procedures, then how come it was missed by so many millions of people involved in the running of the hundreds of thousands of companies that have failed?

The international standard for Organizational Resilience (ISO 22316) is due to publish in 2016, which must be a great relief for all those organisations that are struggling to survive in the ever more competitive markets in which they operate. All they now have to do is implement the standard, be audited for compliance, and get the certificate. So much easier than researching and developing new products, finding new markets, producing the products and services at competitive cost, controlling cash flow, hiring and maintaining the right people with the right skills, complying with ever increasing legislation, developing and enhancing reputation, etc.