Skip navigation

Tag Archives: takeover

Finally, there is real concrete evidence that an organisation’s ability to recover is central to its immediate survival. Not its ability to recover after an incident, but its ability to demonstrate its recovery capability as perceived by others before any incident occurs. Business Continuity is now firmly center stage.

According to The Times, senior UK government officials “want the Co-operative Bank to be sold to a bigger player that could stabilise its IT system, which is feared to be so precarious that the bank could not cope with a serious problem.” For years I’ve been telling senior executives that not being able to demonstrate the existence of credible and tested Business Continuity arrangements could mean the difference between survival and failure, and now I can point to a real example. Business Continuity is not just for use in response to an incident – it must be demonstrable to interested parties well before any incident takes place.

Apparently, In the risk factors disclosed in its annual report, the Co-operative Bank has stated that “whilst a basic level of resilience to a significant data outage is in place, the bank does not currently have a proven end-to-end disaster recovery capability”. How many organisations can really hand on heart state that they have a proven end-to-end disaster recovery capability? Not that many.

Business Continuity has been practised in the banking industry for more than 25 years, and many of today’s accepted Business Continuity ideas and practices started in banking. Where banking leads in Business Continuity, other industries follow.

How long will it be before organisation’s in other industries are put at risk because they do not have a proven end-to-end disaster recovery capability?

Advertisements