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I have been further convinced of the need for the Business Continuity (BC) profession to get back to its fundamentals by the juxtaposition of the publication by the Business Continuity Institute (BCI) of a comprehensive list of legislation, regulations, standards and guidelines in the field of Business Continuity Management (BCM) and the experience of many business that were affected by the recent floods in the north-west of England.

Some small businesses, mainly those that operate and serve very local markets, have temporarily closed until their premises can be refurbished, but others are up and running and continuing to trade even though their premises were badly flooded. The businesses that are back up and running had implemented BC, but not in the way envisaged by the BC profession through its standards and guidelines.

These businesses had taken steps to ensure that they could recover from incidents like the recent flooding by doing such things as backing up their data, implementing cloud computing, knowing where they could obtain replacement premises and equipment, being able to redirect their telephones, and having adequate insurance cover. They are also managed by people who know how to respond to incidents, are committed to the continued success of their business, and know what needs to be recovered by when without having to read a plan.

None of these businesses had implemented a formal BCM programme, none of them had followed any guidelines, and none of them had implemented a Business Continuity Management System (BCMS) or been certified to a BCM standard.

The publication by the BCI of a comprehensive list of BCM legislation, regulations, standards and guidelines is very useful, and I’m not decrying it. But, and it is a very big but, the purpose of BC is to enable organisations to be resilient to incidents that affect their ability to operate. The people who own and run business in the north-west of England that had taken steps to ensure that they could recover from the recent flooding are practising the fundamentals of BC, and by and large have never even heard of BCM legislation, regulations, standards and guidelines.

Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with BCM legislation, regulations, standards and guidelines, but they are not the end in itself. I sometimes think that BC professionals lose sight of this.

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2 Comments

  1. Insightful stuff Mel. I’ve been hearing stories all week such as you describe here, and whilst it might seem disingenuous to say so, an awful lot of success was achieved for those affected by the application of a “bit o’ nous”. I’m also reminded that seldom does the scripted plan survive first contact with the enemy, so whilst our planning activities should, indeed must, attend all regulatory, statutory and business requirements, we should equally allow room for the deployment of a bit of common sense when the merde starts its flight toward the fan.

    • Thanks for the comment Jon. The experience and knowledge gained during process of preparing a plan is often more valuable than the plan itself.


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